Flask Swirler

The Flask Swirler, was developed in the Swastika Lab. by Dr. Edward Ker-Lawson in 1955. It was concerned with an apparatus for converting a rotary motion into a compound oscillatory motion. It is particularly, but not exclusively, concerned with an apparatus for imparting a compound oscillatory movement to a body such as a flask or stirring paddle of the kind used in chemistry laboratories.

The objective for this project was to provide a simple apparatus in which a rotary motion could be changed into a compound oscillatory motion and to provide a device in which a chemist’s flask or stirring paddle can be mounted. Having the device convert a simple rotary motion of a source of power into a compound oscillatory motion of a point located on the flask or stirrer.

Another objective for this invention was to provide an device in which a flask could be supported. The device would impart a compound oscillatory motion to the flask in a way that a point found on the axis of the flask and within the throat of the flask would remain relatively stationary.

The final objective was to provide an apparatus for imparting a swinging motion to a flask in which the portions within the throat of the flask will have relatively little movements. This means the fluid within the flask can be introduced into the flask with a low probability of it being thrown at the user.

This invention gave users a sanitary option in drinking out of a flask.